Primary data collection conducted in 14 communities of Nunavik for community component of Qanuilirpitaa? – the Nunavik Health Survey

With team members Marie Baron and Marie-Claude Lyonnais, we  have returned from Nunavik after conducting primary data collection for the community component of Qanuilirpitaa? the 2017 Nunavik Health Survey. The team travelled to the 14 communities of Nunavik between August 19th and October 5th aboard the Canadian research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen.

The goals of the data collection for the community component were to:

  • identify and characterize community health resources in each village through short structured interviews with every resource;
  • understand how Nunavimmiut view and understand community health in their communities through in depth semi-structured/conversational interviews; and
  • geo-locate community health resources in each community using a GPS, and take photos of each resource. This data will be used to display resources on an interactive map.

The idea for the community component comes from the region itself, as one of Nunavimmiut’s priorities for the follow-up of the Nunavik Health Survey was to consider health at the community scale, moving away from the focus on individual health and well-being.

We are now in the process of analyzing the data, and aim to present results to the communities as they become available.

Salluit
Umiujaq
Salluit
Kangiqsujuaq
On board the CCGS Amundsen

Another version of this post was published online here.

Pre-fieldwork in Kangiqsujuaq for the community component of Qanuilirpitaa Health Survey

In Kangiqsujuaq, Nunavik last month, I was carrying out pre-fieldwork activities for the community component of Qanuilirpitaa, the 2017 Nunavik Inuit Health Survey. Qanuilirpitaa will survey 2000 individuals between August to October 2017 in all 14 communities of Nunavik to measure mental, physical, and spiritual health and well-being.

As part of the community component of Qanuilirpitaa, our team is conducting 70-90 in-depth conversational interviews with a diversity of community members to understand local perspectives on what makes their communities healthy and well. Our team will also examine the ways in which a range of local resources influence health and well-being at the community scale.

For Inuit in Nunavik, going out on the land can be an important part of being healthy and well. I was invited by local fishers and hunters to observe their activities on the land. Here are a few photos from the field.

National Indigenous Peoples Day in Kangiqsujuaq, Nunavik

While in Kangiqsujuaq (aka Wakeham Bay), Nunavik for pre-fieldwork, I was invited to celebrate National Aboriginal Day (recently renamed National Indigenous Peoples Day). The community gathered for a celebratory feast organized by the municipal government. Locals who prepared food were entered into a draw for a chance to win one of many prizes. Together under the longest sun of the year, we feasted upon caribou, arctic char and mussels. Other celebrations included the sharing of stories by elders over the radio, informing younger generations of traditional ways of life.

In light of the celebrations, here are a few related links:

A version of this post was originally published here.